Don't look away!

Every year, as many as 1.8 million children are victims of commercial sexual exploitation worldwide.1 Some are exploited by tourists or travellers, some are trafficked into sexual slavery and millions of images of child sexual abuse circulate daily on the internet.

Welcome to the International Platform against child sex tourism! Helping you to report the sexual exploitation of children in the context of travel and tourism.


1 International Labour Organisation (ILO), 2000. According to UNICEF’s State of the World’s Children (2006), the number could be as high as 2 million.

The sexual exploitation of children...

Even when travelling

Where do you live?

Austria

This website enables individuals to report suspected cases of child sexual exploitation even if they are abroad through providing links to existing national online reporting mechanisms. Where no national reporting mechanism exists, this website will provide alternative information on how to report.

It also provides information on the sexual exploitation of children in the context of travel and tourism (this term is used by ECPAT instead of “child sex tourism” to underline that it is a violation of children’s rights and to avoid presenting it as an acceptable form of tourism). With time, we hope that more and more countries will join this initiative and launch their own national online reporting mechanisms!

Have YOU witnessed a case of child sex tourism while travelling?

Click on your country's flag to see if your country has an online reporting mechanism and help protect a child by reporting what you saw or heard!

By reporting, you could help the police find the perpetrators of these heinous crimes and help the ECPAT network decide where it may need to strengthen its child protection efforts. Ultimately, by reporting cases of child sex tourism, we send a message that we will not tolerate the sexual exploitation of children anywhere. Together we can contribute to a world where children are protected from sexual exploitation.

Don’t Look Away! Report the sexual exploitation of children. Even when travelling.

Also available as smartphone application !

About us

ECPAT is a global network of organisations working together for the elimination of child prostitution, child pornography and trafficking of children for sexual purposes. It seeks to ensure that children everywhere enjoy their fundamental rights, free and secure from all forms of commercial sexual exploitation.

“Don’t Look Away!” is a 3-year project involving members of the ECPAT network from 16 European countries. This project, which aims to promote new ways to combat the sexual exploitation of children in the context of travel and tourism, is co-funded by the European Union. It also benefits from the support of government ministries as well as other public and private actors, including from the tourism sector, in the 16 countries involved.

The project aims to strengthen the protection of children and young people from sexual exploitation at the hands of tourists or travellers through the following four components:

(1) Information campaigns to raise public awareness (of tourists and travellers in particular).
(2) Research on the sexual exploitation of children in travel and tourism.
(3) The creation and promotion of online reporting mechanisms to facilitate the reporting of suspected cases of sexual exploitation of children in the context of travel and tourism.
(4) Mobilising the support and strengthening the capacity of key stakeholders such as the tourism sector, the police and local/state authorities.

This website was created within component (3) of the above-mentioned project.

If you need further information or advice, please don’t hesitate to look for your nearest ECPAT office here and write us an email or give us a call.

How to react?

Advice 01

If You think that the situation is urgent, always call the police immediatly.

Advice 02

If your country does not have an online reporting mechanism you can either use that of another country if you understand the language, or contact your country’s embassy in the travel destination. They may be able to inform the competent authorities

Advice 03

Even if your report does not directly lead to the arrest of the person, it may prove an invaluable contribution to a wider investigation. Often, investigation into sex crimes against children take several years and the exchange of information between different national and international police forces.

Advice 04

By reporting suspected cases of of child sex tourism, and encouraging others to report, you can make a difference! Want to run a campaign? Contact the programme coordinators for information and to receive the campaign material!

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How to react?

Advice 02

If your country does not have an online reporting mechanism you can either use that of another country if you understand the language, or contact your country’s embassy in the travel destination. They may be able to inform the competent authorities

Advice 04

By reporting suspected cases of of child sex tourism, and encouraging others to report, you can make a difference! Want to run a campaign? Contact the programme coordinators for information and to receive the campaign material!

flow

Advice 01

If You think that the situation is urgent, always call the police immediatly.

Advice 03

Even if your report does not directly lead to the arrest of the person, it may prove an invaluable contribution to a wider investigation. Often, investigation into sex crimes against children take several years and the exchange of information between different national and international police forces.

Outcome

Outcome

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Reporting provides useful information to the police in different countries as to where children are being sexually exploited.

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Reporting suspected cases of child sex tourism sends a strong global message that we do not tolerate the sexual exploitation of children - neither at home nor abroad!

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Ultimately, acting together and reporting suspected cases of child sex tourism contributes to protecting children from sexual exploitation and reducing the number of victims.

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Reporting helps keep ECPAT informed of the locations where it needs to focus its works to prevent the sexual exploitation of children and protect its victims.

About the problem

The national reporting mechanisms

The national reporting mechanisms all have their own ways of functioning and are not currently standardised. Nevertheless, they all enable information regarding cases of child sexual exploitation to be transmitted to the relevant authorities of that country. In addition, both national and European law enforcement authorities cooperate with each other and exchange information regarding travelling child sex offenders. For more information about how reporting child sex tourism works in your country, please click on your country flag. Where no national online reporting mechanism exists, you will find advice on how to report cases of “child sex tourism” in other ways. You may also choose the online reporting mechanism of another country if you know the language and accept the conditions of the respective reporting form (e.g. depending on the reporting mechanism, you may not be able to make an anonymous report). If you need further information or advice, please don’t hesitate to look for your nearest ECPAT office here and write us an email or give us a call.

Sexual exploitation of children in the context of travel and tourism (child sex tourism)

The sexual exploitation of children in the context of travel and tourism (this term is used by ECPAT instead of “child sex tourism” to underline that it is a violation of children’s rights and to avoid presenting it as an acceptable form of tourism) occurs when an individual travels, either within his/her own country or internationally, and engages in sexual acts with a child (i.e. a person who is less than 18 years old). The perpetrators of such crimes often travel from a richer country to a poorer one but they may also travel within their own country.

Not all perpetrators are paedophiles (adults with a sexual preference for prepubescent children). Some offenders may be tempted to engage in sexual acts with a child whilst away from home due to various reasons such as a feeling of anonymity and/or impunity, because the opportunity presents itself more easily, or because of prejudices. (S)he may be curious to “experience something new” and may be encouraged by the fact that the exploitation appears to be open or tolerated within the community. Some victims may be trafficked and forced into sexual slavery through violent means whilst others may seem complicit. However, this complicity is often the result of remuneration in cash or in kind made by the perpetrator to the victim or his/her family. It is still a situation of exploitation.

Sexual exploitation of children in the context of travel and tourism is a growing problem and new forms are constantly emerging, particularly as different types of tourism and travel develop in new destination countries. As the problem grows and travel becomes more accessible, it has also become more frequent for tourists and travellers to witness situations in which children are sexually exploited. Almost all European countries have adopted extraterritorial laws that allow for child sex offenders to be prosecuted in their home country for crimes committed abroad.



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About us

ECPAT is a global network of organisations working together for the elimination of child prostitution, child pornography and trafficking of children for sexual purposes. It seeks to ensure that children everywhere enjoy their fundamental rights, free and secure from all forms of commercial sexual exploitation.

Copyright 2014 & Disclaimer

This website was co-funded by the European Union. The content of this web site does not necessarily reflect the official opinion of the European Union. Responsibility for the information and views expressed on this website lies entirely with ECPAT

Contacts

Six members of ECPAT’s global network coordinate this project:

ECPAT Austria
+43 1 293 16 66,
info[at]ecpat.at
ECPAT Germany
+49 761 45687 148,
info[at]ecpat.de
ECPAT Netherlands
(Defence for Children)
+31 71 516 09 80,
info[at]ecpat.nl
ECPAT France
+ 33 1 49 34 83 13,
contact[at]ecpat-france.org
ECPAT Luxembourg*
+352 26 27 08 09,
ecpat-luxembourg[at]ecpat.lu
ECPAT Poland
(Nobody’s Children Foundation)
+48 616 02 68,
fdn[at]fdn.pl

* For questions related to this website, please contact ECPAT Luxembourg.

The European Platform is also available as a smartphone application!